More "Draw Something" Strategy

More "Draw Something" Strategy

Four ways to improve your game

OK… I might be a little bit obsessed with this game. Having finally managed to assemble a pretty good list of friends to play with, I have been spending at least an hour a day rapt with attention, drawing random things with my fingertip. 
 
And I'd like to think I have gotten pretty good at it, too! The only time someone hasn't been able to guess one of my drawings recently, it's because I had accidentally chosen something that I knew I couldn't draw… but instead of clicking the bomb to get more words, I clicked "Les Paul." Oy.
 
1. Use background color
Choosing a basic background color can help place your drawing in the right setting, right from the beginning. A few quick strokes with the widest pen will fill in your screen quickly.

 
Using two colors to fill in the background, and proportion of the colors you use, can really help set the scene. Filling the top 2/3rds with sky blue and the bottom 1/3rd with green emphasizes that "this is something that flies." Filling the top 1/3rd with sky blue and the bottom 2/3rds with dark blue tells your partner "this is on the ocean."
 
2. Use the eraser 
The eraser can help you "paint with white." If you're drawing something white - like a bride - paint in your background first, then use the eraser to delete a bride-shaped hole. To draw "Nun" it's easiest to paint the nun's form in black, then use the eraser to delete her head area.
 
I also will take any excuse to draw googly eyes. Paint in your character or animal, then do two dots with the second-from-smallest eraser brush. Then add two dots of black with the smallest paint brush for pupils. They always end up askew. It's always hilarious!
 
3. Use "Undo"
At the bottom of your drawing screen there's an "undo" button. It's an arrow curling around to the left, like a backwards letter C. This undoes the last thing you did. It's often a lot easier to undo the last line that you did, rather than trying to erase over a bunch of other stuff you've drawn.
 
4. Add scale
Scale is the difference between "forest" and "broccoli." For forest, add a few tiny people to show that your trees are tree-sized. For broccoli, draw it on a plate, and add a knife and fork beside it. As with adding a background color, this is all about giving your drawings context to help your partner guess correctly.